Pizza Sauce Recipe – Chef John Food Wishes

Pizza Sauce (Wonderful) Recipe

Chef John Food Wishes

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Chef John always has an interesting take on the recipes he puts out. This one on Pizza Sauce is no exception.

Enjoy

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Chicago Style Pizza with tomato sauce

The misconception that the tomato has been central to Italian cuisine since its introduction from the Americas is often repeated. Though the tomato was introduced from the Spanish New World to European botanists in the 16th century, tomato sauce made a relatively late entry in Italian cuisine: in Antonio Latini‘s cookbook Lo scalco alla moderna (Naples, 1692).

Latini was chef to the Spanish viceroy of Naples, and one of his tomato recipes is for sauce alla spagnuola, “in the Spanish style”. The first known use of tomato sauce with pasta appears in the Italian cookbook L’Apicio moderno, by Roman chef Francesco Leonardi, edited in 1790.

 

Margarita Pizza with tomato sauce

 

Italian varieties of tomato sauce range from the very simple pasta al pomodoro to the piquant puttanesca and arrabbiata sauces. Tomato sauce with pasta can stand on its own or it can also be paired with ingredients such as Italian sausage, clams, bacon cubes, tuna, meatballs or vegetables, for a more lively pasta dish.

Tomato-garlic sauce is prepared using tomatoes as a main ingredient, and is used in various cuisines and dishes. In Italian cuisine, alla pizzaiola refers to tomato-garlic sauce, which is used on pizza, pasta and meats.

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Some Italian Americans on the East Coast and around the Chicago area refer to tomato sauce as “gravy“, “tomato gravy”, or “Sunday gravy”, especially sauces with a large quantity of meat simmered in them, similar to the Italian Neapolitan ragù. The term “Sunday gravy” derives from the Italian tradition of having a large, family dinner on Sunday afternoons. “Gravy” is an erroneous English translation from the Italian sugo which means juice, but can also mean sauce (as in sugo per pastasciutta).

The expression for “gravy” in Italian is sugo d’arrosto, which is literally “juice of a roast” and is not specifically tomato sauce. Sicilian Americans in communities like Buffalo and RochesterNew York use the terms “sarsa” and “succu” interchangeably for tomato sauces of all types used with pasta, and “gravy” only in reference to brown meat gravies. The Italian-American community of New Orleans, however, is largely Sicilian in origin and takes great pride in its Creole-Italian cuisine largely based on what is known locally as “red gravy” (tomato sauce).

American supermarkets commonly carry a variety of prepared tomato sauces described as “spaghetti sauce” or “pasta sauce.” Common variations include meat sauce, marinara sauce, and sauces with mushrooms or sweet red peppers.

 

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