Gregory Peck & Audrey Hepburn “Roman Holiday”

Roman Holiday

“I don’t know how to say Goodbye”

Audrey Hepburn / Gregory Peck

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In 1999, Roman Holiday was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Roman Holiday

Gregory Peck and Audrey Hepburn

View this Memorable clip
“I Don’t Know How to Say Goodbye”

on the Video below

Interesting Facts

Roman Holiday is a 1953 American romantic comedy directed and produced by William Wyler. It stars Gregory Peck as a reporter and Audrey Hepburn as a royal princess out to see Rome on her own. Hepburn won an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance; the screenplay and costume design also won.

In 1999, Roman Holiday was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

It was written by John Dighton and Dalton Trumbo, though with Trumbo on the Hollywood blacklist, he did not receive a credit; instead, Ian McLellan Hunter fronted for him. Trumbo’s credit was reinstated when the film was released on DVD in 2003. On December 19, 2011, full credit for Trumbo’s work was restored. Blacklisted director Bernard Vorhaus worked on the film as an assistant director under a pseudonym.

It was shot at the Cinecittà studios and on location around Rome during the “Hollywood on the Tiber” era. The film was screened in the 14th Venice film festival within the official program.

William Wyler first offered the role to Hollywood favorite Cary Grant. Grant declined, believing he was too old to play Hepburn’s love interest (though he played opposite her ten years later in Charade.) Other sources say Grant declined because he knew all of the attention would be centered around the princess. Peck’s contract gave him solo star billing, with newcomer Hepburn listed much less prominently in the credits. Halfway through the filming, Peck suggested to Wyler that he elevate her to equal billing — an almost unheard-of gesture in Hollywood.

From Wikipedia