Soppressata Homemade – Rossella’s Cooking with Nonna

Soppressata Homemade

Rossella’s Cooking with Nonna

 

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This video recipe is from our friends at Rossella Cooking with Nonna. Rosella and her Dad Vito as her producer takes the time to tell the whole story. In this case it is about one of the most interesting and ancient methods of curing meats. Something we absolutely love in our house………….. Soppressata.  OMG

 

 

Soppressata

 

Soppressata is an Italian dry salami. Even if there are many variations, two principal types are made: a cured dry sausage typical of Basilicata, Apulia, and Calabria, and a very different uncured salame, made in Tuscany and Liguria.

 

 

Soppressata

 

Soppressata is part of southern Italian cultural heritage, much more than in the north, that locals (especially in the smaller rural towns) will still slaughter the pig themselves and make their own soppressata. Along with other cured meats as a tradition, nothing goes to waste. Soppressata is sometimes prepared using ham.

 

 

Soppressata

 

Soppressata di Basilicata is mainly produced in Rivello, Cancellara, Vaglio, and Lagonegro. Soppressata di Calabria enjoys Protected designation of origin status; the one produced in Acri and Decollatura is especially renowned.  Soppressata di Puglia from Martina Franca is also very well-known.

 

Soppresatte and other curing Italian meats

 

Soppressata Toscana, soppressata from Tuscany, is made from the leftover parts of the pig. First, the head is boiled for a few hours. When it is done, it is picked of meat and skin. All of the meat and skin, including the tongue, are chopped, seasoned, and then stuffed into a large casing. The cooking liquid is poured in to cover the mixture and it is then hung and the cooking liquid (high in gelatin) thickens to bind everything together.

 

Soppressata

 

Sopressa Veneta got its name from the practice of pressing the salami between planks of wood resulting in a straight, flattened shape. The northern Italian version from Vicenza, in the Veneto region, did away with the pressed shape and has become an international favorite.

 

 

Soppressata

 

Click here for the video and written Recipe

 

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